Could a curry a week PREVENT dementia? Turmeric ‘blocks the rogue proteins that trigger Alzheimer’s disease’

Herbs and Helpers

Curcumin, key chemical in turmeric, protects against Alzheimer’s

Scientists believe it blocks beta amyloid proteins that form plaques

These plaques are the most common sign of the disease, experts say

Eating curry at least once a week may help ward off dementia, according to scientists.

The study shows that a spice commonly used in the dish boosts brain power and protects against memory loss in old age.

Curcumin, the key chemical in turmeric used in everything from mild Kormas to the hottest Vindaloos, is believed to delay or prevent dementia symptoms.

A study of middle aged and elderly people found those who popped a capsule of the stuff three times a day had better memories than those given a dummy pill.

Eating curry at least once a week can protect against developing dementia, a new study has revealed

It adds to evidence that older people living in cultures where curry is a staple have better cognitive function and a lower prevalence of dementia.

The yellow spice turmeric was identified as the most probable reason for this – thanks to curcumin.

The year long trial published in the British Journal of Nutrition found evidence curcumin blocks rogue proteins called beta amyloid which clumps together and destroys neurons.

In the study 96 participants aged between 40 and 90 were given either a daily placebo or 1,500 mg of curcumin for 12 months.

In tests of verbal and memory skills, those taking the dummy pill suffered a decline in mental function after just six months that was not observed in those having the curcumin.

Dr Stephanie Rainey-Smith, of Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia, said: ‘Curcumin therapy in animals has produced positive cognitive and behavioural outcomes; results of human trials, however, have been inconsistent.

Curcumin, the key chemical in turmeric used in everything from mild Kormas to the hottest Vindaloos, is believed to block rogue proteins called beta amyloid which clumps together to form plaques which destroy neurons – a key hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease

‘In this study, we report the results of a 12-month, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study that investigated the ability of a curcumin formulation to prevent cognitive decline in a population of community-dwelling older adults.’

She added: ‘Our findings suggest that further longitudinal assessment is required to investigate changes in cognitive outcome measures, ideally in conjunction with biological markers of neurodegeneration.’

About half of the participants ingested a 500mg curcumin capsule three times a day after meals with water. The placebo group took a placebo capsule at the same times.

The study is among a plethora of new research giving hope to how medicinal foods, if not drugs, may be the answer to taming this debilitating disease.

But one of the issues with curcumin is poor intestinal absorption.

Seeking to overcome these limitations, food ingredient formulators have begun to employ a variety of approaches to enhance this.

Professor Alf Lindberg, scientific director at Cambridge Nutraceuticals, said: ‘It is well known curcumin is poorly absorbed in the gut.

‘In our newly developed supplement FutureYou Mind+, we combine the curcumin with soy lecithin in order to prevent it being destroyed in the stomach.

‘This allows curcumin to pass through to the intestine where it is absorbed and distributed around the body.’

Dr Laura Phipps, of Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: ‘While there has been some early stage research into the effects of curcumin on brain health, there is currently no conclusive evidence it could prevent or treat dementia in people’

The unique supplement combines easily absorbed curcumin from turmeric and omega 3, the brain boosting fat found in oily fish, which contributes to normal mental function.

Dr Laura Phipps, of Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: ‘While there has been some early stage research into the effects of curcumin on brain health, there is currently no conclusive evidence it could prevent or treat dementia in people.

‘Some studies have produced limited evidence very high doses of curcumin- much higher than might be normally found in foods like curry – could have some impact on memory and thinking skills, but large-scale clinical trials will be required before researchers can fully assess any potential benefits.

‘The best current evidence suggests that not smoking, staying mentally and physically active, eating a balanced diet, keeping high blood pressure and cholesterol in check, and only drinking within recommended limits can all help to maintain a healthy brain as we age.’

Source: Daily Mail

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Old pesticide manufacturing company now deemed hazardous waste zone by the government… but the same chemicals are 'safe' enough for food crops?

(NaturalNews) A recent press release by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) states that the former Kil-Tone Company facility in Vineland, N.J., has now been added to its “Superfund list of the country’s most hazardous waste sites.”In its own words, the EPA explains…


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How tomatoes could help older men spend a penny

Herbs and Helpers

Experts believe nutrients in tomatoes could help ease bladder problems

The chemical lycopene can reduce the expansion of the prostate

Lycopene is also what gives tomatoes their startling red colour

A nutrient found in tomatoes could help ease bladder problems in older men, experts believe.

They discovered that the chemical lycopene, which gives tomatoes their red colour, can reduce the expansion of the prostate.

The gland is wrapped around the urinary tract, and its enlargement in later life can make urinating slow or difficult – a condition called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

The chemical lycopene, which gives tomatoes their red colour, can reduce the expansion of the prostate and help ease bladder problems in older men, experts believe

A team reviewed research into the chemical, and published their findings in the journal Oncology and Cancer Case Reports. Professor Hiten Patel, from the University of Tromso in Norway, said: ‘We knew lycopene seems to slow down prostate cancer, but now it seems it can slow down the enlargement of the prostate and development of BPH as well.

‘We need more research before we can say it should be recommended routinely, but this review is very promising.’

One of the problems highlighted was that lycopene is not easily absorbed by the body. However researchers believe that giving it as a pill could get round this.

Source: Daily Mail

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We’re bombarded with ‘health-giving’ foods from coconut water to probiotics, but are they…FAD or FACT?

Herbs and Helpers

Fans of those little yogurty probiotic shots were dealt a blow this month: they are a waste of money, claimed Danish researchers, who said they did nothing tangible to improve digestive wellbeing.

The study has highlighted the sometimes confusing world of so-called ‘naturally healthy’ and ‘functional foods’ – which make up five per cent of all food bought in the UK.

From coconut water and trendy, dairy-free milks to cholesterol-lowering spreads and smart water, we are bombarded with claims that must-eat products will give us glowing skin or a trimmer waist, or keep our hearts healthy.

But just how good for us are they really?

For my new book The Right Bite, a guide to eating smart on the go, and on my website, well-well-well.co.uk, I analysed menus from countless coffee shops and restaurants, and scoured supermarkets to find out which of these products’ claims are rooted in fact – and which are nothing but a fad.

So should you steer clear of frozen yogurts and pass on the popcorn, and does gluten-free necessarily mean healthy?

PROBIOTICS

THE HEALTH CLAIM: Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts added to yogurts or taken as a supplement to stimulate growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut.

THE BIG NAMES: Actimel says its bottle containing ten million bacteria and Vitamins B6 and D is a ‘great way to start the day’, while rival brand Yakult ‘cares about keeping your gut healthy’.

THE TRUTH: I wouldn’t bother with these shots or yogurts – at least not for their supposed probiotic benefits.

It is true that we have bacteria in the gut that is vital for digestive and immune function. But as studies, including the recent Danish one, have suggested, probiotic-fortified foods probably don’t affect the balance of gut bacteria in healthy people.

The dose is probably too small to have much of an effect. I do recommend probiotic supplements, though, as they give a bigger dose that is scientifically proven to help recovery from C.diff infection in the elderly, and may well be a remedy for other digestive upsets.

VERDICT: FAD

POPCORN

THE HEALTH CLAIM: Popcorn has been touted for years as a low-fat, high-fibre snack. It’s rumoured that Madonna got back into shape four weeks after the birth of her daughter Lourdes by snacking on the stuff.

THE BIG NAMES: Metcalfe’s Skinny Popcorn (70g, £1.49) says its Cinema Sweet flavour has ‘only 93 calories per serving, say hello to guilt free munching!’ Propercorn (90g, £1.59) claims to be ‘a brilliant source of fibre’.

Skinny popcorn is a ‘good option’ for a snack according to Jackie, as long as portions are properly limited
Skinny popcorn is a ‘good option’ for a snack according to Jackie, as long as portions are properly limited

THE TRUTH: If you’re going for a snack, this is a good option. Plain popcorn is a wholegrain food with more fibre per serving than a skin-on baked potato (3.5g compared to 3g).

Studies have proved that you will also feel fuller for longer after eating a packet, compared to crisps. Just watch out for shop-bought versions that are slathered with oil, sugar and salt.

And limit your portions! A large cinema bucket of sweet or salted popcorn can deliver more than 900 calories.

VERDICT: FACT

COCONUT WATER

HEALTH CLAIM: Low in calories (about 40 per 200ml carton) and, due to naturally occurring potassium and magnesium, more hydrating than plain water.

THE BIG NAMES: Vita Coco (500ml, £1.99), promoted by Bajan pop star Rihanna, has dubbed its ‘refreshing and nutrient-packed’ coconut water ‘Mother Nature’s drink of choice’, while Chi (1 ltr, £3.49) promises its drinks are ‘high in potassium and packed with electrolytes [sugars and salts] which keep your body rehydrated, vibrant and healthy’.

THE TRUTH: This is touted as a natural sports recovery drink containing electrolytes.

But you will only really benefit from one of these after training for more than an hour at medium to high intensity – and losing a lot of salt in sweat.

For the average person, quaffing coconut water throughout the day won’t deliver any benefits, and a small 330ml carton contains more than four teaspoons of sugar – over half of your recommended daily limit – which won’t do your waistline any favours.

VERDICT: FAD

SMART WATER

HEALTH CLAIM: Bottled water that contains natural or added ingredients that make them more hydrating than plain water, or provide vitamins, minerals and other nutritional benefits with zero calories.

THE BIG NAMES: Coca Cola’s Glaceau Smartwater (600ml, 50p), drunk by Friends star Jennifer Aniston, is ‘vapour distilled’ so it is ‘pure and crisp like from a cloud’ with ‘added electrolytes’, while their vitamin-enriched Vitaminwater has flavours named ‘focus’, ‘endurance’, ‘refresh’, ‘defence’ and ‘essential’.

Vitaminwater, pictured, contains almost four teaspoons of sugar per bottle, says nutritionist Jackie
Vitaminwater, pictured, contains almost four teaspoons of sugar per bottle, says nutritionist Jackie
THE TRUTH: Smartwater is just distilled tap water with added salts – or electrolytes. But the amounts here are too low to make it work as a sports recovery drink.

What’s the point? I would steer clear of Vitaminwater, too. It contains almost four teaspoons (15g) of sugar per 500ml bottle, which is half the recommended daily limit.

VERDICT: FAD

BRAN MUFFIN

THE HEALTH CLAIM: A bran muffin instead of a butter croissant seems like a virtuous choice when grabbing breakfast on the go.

THE BIG NAMES: Sandwich chain Pret A Manger boasts that its High Fibre Muffin (130g, £1.50) is ‘delicious and nutritious… with more fibre than a bowl of All Bran’.

THE TRUTH: I’m impressed by the Pret muffin: it has 11g of fibre compared to 2g found in the average shop-bought chocolate or blueberry version, and 10g of protein (there’s 26g in the average chicken breast).

It’s a combination that will balance blood sugar and keep hunger at bay. However, at 442 calories and nearly six of your daily seven teaspoons of sugar, it should be an occasional treat.

VERDICT: FACT

FROZEN YOGURT

THE HEALTH CLAIM: A familiar sight in supermarket frozen food sections and billed as a ‘guilt-free’ low-fat alternative to ice cream. One 100ml serving of Waitrose frozen natural yogurt dessert has 90 calories and 1.1g saturated fat.

THE BIG NAMES: Yoo Moo (500ml, £2.50) claim to make ‘the best guilt-free frozen yogurt in the land’, while Snog (450ml, £2) says ‘make your Snog as healthy or as indulgent as you fancy.’

Frozen yogurt is a ‘classic diet misconception’, says Jackie, because it has roughly the same amount of sugar as ice cream, although is lower in fat
Frozen yogurt is a ‘classic diet misconception’, says Jackie, because it has roughly the same amount of sugar as ice cream, although is lower in fat
THE TRUTH: This is a classic diet misconception: frozen yogurt is lower in fat than standard ice cream, but contains roughly the same amount of sugar.

And we now know it’s the sugar that’s the most damaging thing to our bodies. In fact, the healthiest thing about a tub of Haagen-Dazs (also loaded with sugar) is the full-fat cream used.

VERDICT: FAD

DRIED FRUIT

HEALTH CLAIM: Seen as a ‘healthy’ snack – especially for children – with added benefits of fibre, antioxidants and vitamins and minerals.

THE BIG NAMES: Bear Yoyo (five 20g packs, £2.29) says its products are ‘high in fibre with the same natural sugars as a small apple’, while Nakd flavoured raisins (25g, 40p) boast ‘all natural flavours and ingredients, no added sugar and count towards your five a day’.

Jackie says dried fruit is a ‘shocker’ because it is ‘mainly sugar’ and the drying process ‘reduces’ its antioxidant content
Jackie says dried fruit is a ‘shocker’ because it is ‘mainly sugar’ and the drying process ‘reduces’ its antioxidant content
THE TRUTH: It’s a shocker, but dried fruit is mainly sugar. People often say they’re a good source of fibre but a single date provides 0.6g (of the 30g a day recommended) along with a whole teaspoon of sugar. A raisin contains about four times as much sugar as a grape.

The commercial drying process can be extremely brutal on delicate plant compounds, so much of the antioxidant content is significantly reduced. Give your kids an apple instead!

VERDICT: FAD

MAPLE SYRUP & HONEY

HEALTH CLAIM: Millions of Britons have turned to so-called sugar-free diets, substituting the white stuff for natural, unrefined substitutes such as maple syrup and honey, which contain minerals and antioxidants.

BIG NAMES: All supermarkets stock their own-brand honeys and maple syrups. Pure Maple (330g, £6.95) says its 100 per cent Canadian maple syrup is ‘packed full of antioxidants and nutrients’ while Hilltop Honey (110g, £2.61) says its product is ‘purity in a jar… contains all the enzymes that make honey good for you’.

THE TRUTH: Maple syrup contains small amounts of calcium, potassium, iron and zinc, and some antioxidants, and honey contains trace amounts of vitamins and mineral.

But both are more than 75 per cent sugar (the rest is water). And sugar is sugar.

VERDICT: FAD

GLUTEN-FREE BREAD, PASTA AND CAKES

THE HEALTH CLAIM: Gluten-free foods are suitable for people who have an adverse reaction to gluten, a protein that’s present in bread, pasta and cakes.

THE BIG NAMES: Udi say they make the ‘best-tasting’ gluten-free bagels, rolls, snacks and sweet treats. Genius say their range of gluten-free foods ‘smells, tastes and feels every bit as good as traditional wheat products’.

Gluten-free bread is both ‘fact and fad’, says Jackie, because it is essential for people with digestive problems but is not a ‘byword for healthy’
Gluten-free bread is both ‘fact and fad’, says Jackie, because it is essential for people with digestive problems but is not a ‘byword for healthy’
THE TRUTH: I’d put this in the same category as trendy dairy-milk alternatives.

Gluten-free food is essential for people with coeliac disease, an autoimmune condition triggered by gluten, or an intolerance.

But it’s not a byword for ‘healthy’. There’s a trend for going gluten-free without having a digestive problem, which is misguided.

Gluten-free muffins, cakes and biscuits can contain just as much sugar as standard types.

VERDICT: FACT AND FAD

TRENDY MILKS

THE HEALTH CLAIM: Dairy-free milks such as those made from almond and soya are suitable for people who can’t digest lactose, a type of sugar found in dairy, or casein, a milk protein.

THE BIG NAMES: Alpro Soya Original (1 ltr, £1.40) is ‘plant-based goodness’ and ‘a source of calcium, just like milk’. Arla Lactofree (1 ltr, £1.35) has added enzymes to help ‘conquer cramps’.

THE TRUTH: There is no arguing that lactose-free milks are a good option for anyone who has been diagnosed with lactose intolerance or casein (milk- protein) allergy.

Nut milks are my favourite – almond milks tend to be made with just almonds and water and are the least processed of all non-dairy milks.

Watch out for added sugar in some soya drinks. And, if you’re not intolerant or allergic to a component of dairy, or vegan, there’s no huge benefit to be had.

VERDICT: FACT AND FAD

LOW-FAT SPREADS

HEALTH CLAIM: Brands such as Flora have half the saturated fat of butter and are made with seed oils packed with heart-healthy Omega-3 and 6 and Vitamins A, D and E, with compounds called plant sterols that help to reduce blood cholesterol.

THE BIG NAMES: Flora Proactiv (500g, £3.50) says it harnesses the ‘natural power of added plant sterols’. Benecol Light Spread (500g, £3) is ‘proven to lower cholesterol’.

Studies have show low-fat spreads do work to reduce cholesterol in conjunction with a balanced diet
Studies have show low-fat spreads do work to reduce cholesterol in conjunction with a balanced diet
THE TRUTH: People are sceptical about these spreads as they are not ‘natural’.

But they do work. Studies have shown that a daily intake of 1.5g to 2.4g of plant sterols (30g of spread every day – about two-and-a-half tablespoons) does reduce cholesterol.

But it is important to remember that having a low level of cholesterol is just one part of the heart-health jigsaw, along with staying a healthy weight, not smoking or drinking too much, and eating a balanced diet.

VERDICT: FACT

Source: Daily Mail

The post We’re bombarded with ‘health-giving’ foods from coconut water to probiotics, but are they…FAD or FACT? appeared first on Herbs and Helpers – Herbal Services and Solutions | Herbalist | Supplier | Herbs.


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Public Health England: Advice to eat more fat ‘irresponsible’

Herbs and Helpers

Full-fat dairy may be protective, the National Obesity Forum said
Advice to eat more fat is irresponsible and potentially deadly, Public Health England’s chief nutritionist has said.
Dr Alison Tedstone was responding to a report by the National Obesity Forum, which suggests eating fat could help cut obesity and type 2 diabetes.
The charity said promoting low-fat food had had “disastrous health consequences” and should be reversed.
Other experts have also criticised the recommendation to eat more fat, saying the report cherry-picked evidence.

Dr Aseem Malhotra, a senior adviser to the National Obesity Forum, said: “The change in dietary advice to promote low fat foods is perhaps the biggest mistake in modern medical history.
“We must urgently change the message to the public to reverse obesity and type 2 diabetes. Eat fat to get slim, don’t fear fat, fat is your friend.”

Risk

Dr Tedstone responded by saying: “In the face of all the evidence, calling for people to eat more fat, cut out carbs and ignore calories is irresponsible.”
She said thousands of scientific studies were considered as part of the official guidance adopted throughout the UK, whereas the National Obesity Forum quoted just 43 studies, some of which were comment pieces.
She added: “It’s a risk to the nation’s health when potentially influential voices suggest people should eat a high fat diet, especially saturated fat. Too much saturated fat in the diet increases the risk of raised cholesterol, a route to heart disease and possible death.”

The report argues:

Eating fat does not make you fat
Saturated fat does not cause heart disease and full-fat dairy is probably protective

Processed foods labelled “low fat”, “lite”, “low cholesterol” or “proven to lower cholesterol” should be avoided

Starchy and refined carbohydrates should be limited to prevent and reverse type 2 diabetes

Optimum sugar consumption for health is zero

Industrial vegetable oils should be avoided

People should stop counting calories
You cannot outrun a bad diet

Snacking will make you fat

Evidence-based nutrition should be incorporated into education curricula for all healthcare professionals

The report also said humans had evolved to be a “healthy well-nourished species with a long life expectancy”, but this had gone wrong in the past 30 years.

It said there was too much focus on calories when “it is highly irrelevant how many calories a portion of food on a plate contains” and it was “untrue” that excessive calories caused obesity.
Naveed Sattar, a professor of metabolic medicine at the University of Glasgow, said the report was “good, bad and ugly”.

He backed calls to cut snacking, but said eating more fat as a cure for obesity and type 2 diabetes was “not warranted” by the evidence and would have “adverse” consequences.

He said the authors had been selective in their choice of evidence and had ignored “an abundant literature which goes against their conclusions”.

The government’s obesity adviser Prof Susan Jebb said the “current dietary advice is based on the best evidence we have”.

She said the debate should be widened from a focus on fat. “We’re eating too many calories – if we want to tackle obesity people do need to eat fewer calories [and] that means less fat and less sugar.”

The Faculty of Public Health’s Prof Simon Capewell said the focus on nutritional guidelines was “a huge distraction from the real causes of obesity” such as advertising cheap junk food to children.
And he said he was worried that the National Obesity Forum report “is not peer reviewed and does not indicate who wrote it or how it was funded”.

The National Obesity Forum says it is an independent organisation that receives professional and financial support from the food industry, pharmaceutical companies and medical bodies.

Prof Tom Sanders from King’s College London said: “It is not helpful to slag off the sensible dietary advice.

“The harsh criticism of current dietary guidelines meted out in this report is not justified as few people adhere to these guidelines anyway.

“There is good evidence that those that do follow the guidelines have less weight gain and better health outcomes.”

Source: BBC

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5 foods to fight disease

foodsDiabetes, cancer, arthritis, migraine – these are some of diseases that can threaten our lives or drastically shorten it. Most people know that poor diet can worsen these conditions, but few know that proper diet helps their treatment, detention and even deal with them. Joy Bauer , author of “Food cures”, will share her recipe for a longer and healthier life with this article.

An old proverb says: you are what you eat. This means that if you eat junk food, it probably means your life will end, because of illness. However, if you choose to eat foods rich in valuable nutrients, can achieve good overall condition of your body.

According to Joy Bauer, one of the best experts in the field of dietetics, the backbone of a healthy diet consists of proteins found in lean meats, high-carbohydrate, monounsaturated and omega-3 fats, and foods rich in water. These nutrients are found in foods that are proven to improve the health of the person and sometimes have the best drugs to combat various health conditions.

Food is medicine and it is powerful. We eat every day several times and therefore take medicines in the form of food that can promote or worsen our condition.

Five foods for each of the following conditions:

Overweight

Rich in fiber (fiber) cereals. Look for products that include more than 5 grams fiber and less than 120 calories per serving.
Cucumbers are rich in water and low calorie vegetables you feel fuller for longer.
Egg whites contain a significant quantity of high quality protein. This food will increase your metabolism and help maintain muscle mass while burning fat
Sugar-free gum. Give your taste senses something sweet, to avoid to put something caloric in your mouth
Coffee with skim milk. Reason that is warm, you’ll drink more slowly, which will help you feel fuller. Milk and caffeine will give you energy

Diabetes

Oily fish (salmon, mackerel) are good sources of vitamin D. Furthermore, the fat contained in them, reducing the risk of developing diabetes.
Turkey and chicken contain significant amounts of quality protein, which reduces the absorption of carbohydrates and delay their entry into circulation. This prevents sharp increases in blood sugar.
Soy meal is also rich in omega-3 fatty acids. It is an ideal combination of valuable proteins and carbohydrates, reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Skimmed yogurt is calcium-rich food that improves insulin sensitivity and helps to control blood pressure.
Beetroot is a combination of carbohydrates with a low glycemic index and magnesium. This plant reduces the risk of diabetes by 33%.

Cardiovascular disease

Oily fish (salmon, mackerel) are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. These fish thin the blood and lower levels in the blood.
Bananas contain potassium and magnesium and helps maintain blood pressure within normal limits.
Brussels sprouts are a good source of soluble fiber, giving it the ability to lower levels of “bad” cholesterol.
Oatmeal is another good source of soluble fiber that helps maintain normal levels of blood cholesterol.
Sunflower seeds are rich in soluble fiber, fiber and folic acid. This food fights cardiovascular disease. It is best to pick the sunflower seeds, which they do not add salt.

Migraine

Enriched with omega-3 eggs are eggs from hens fed flaxseed and fish mixtures. They are extremely rich in omega-3 and thus reduce inflammation as the cause of migraines.
Beans are rich in magnesium, a mineral deficiency that is associated with the condition of migraine.
Fresh milk contains significant amounts of riboflavin, vitamin B group, which plays an essential role in energy production at the cellular level. Lack of cellular energy is considered to cause unlocks Miguel.
Linseed is a good source of essential omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation.
Spinach is a leafy green plant that is an excellent source of magnesium.

Arthritis

Red peppers are rich in vitamin C and many other colorful vegetables. Vitamin C is responsible for maintaining the health of collagen – the main ingredient of cartilage tissue.
Carrots contain beta-carotene, a powerful antioxidant.
Strawberries, raspberries and blueberries are rich in anthocyanidins (anthocyanins), which are antioxidants. Furthermore, these foods reduce inflammation.
Oranges are a good source of vitamin C and beta-cryptoxanthin, which are food reducing risk of inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis. They can slow its progress and reduce pain.
Pumpkin is rich in valuable beta-cryptoxanthin and beta-carotene

Compliance with a rational diet and eating healthy foods can be a daunting task, especially if you need to sacrifice food, we adore and we used to eat. But according to experts concluded that the victims seem to achieve good health. Once you notice the difference in how you feel, you will continue to follow a healthy lifestyle.

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American College of Physicians encourages doctors to 'counsel' patients on guns and report data to third parties

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